Sunday, March 01, 2015. Last Update: Fri 2:51 PM EST

Language Corner

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Why we ‘stave off’ colds

It all started with wine

"I'm trying to stave off a cold," a friend said. Another responded, "Wine will work for that." Neither probably realized... More

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Warm up with words

Tropical differences

On a frigid day in the Northeast, let's turn our thoughts to the tropics. Wouldn't you rather be on a... More

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Confused on conflated?

When Brian Williams uttered the word in his on-air apology, people flocked to online dictionaries for answers

When Brian Williams said he had "conflated" his memories of what happened with his helicopter in Iraq in 2003, it... More

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Journalism and clichés

These kinds of expressions are trite, overused and hackneyed

We did a Twitter chat last week in which the most spirited discussion, started by Samantha Grossman, was about which... More

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In between ‘before’ and ‘after’

Think before you speak

Today, we're going to discuss "prior to" and "following," in the hopes that some people will realize they are not... More

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Is it now-defunct or now defunct?

Examining whether or not you should use a hyphen for this journalism mannerism

The new general manager of the New York Jets "was a league scout in the American offices of the now-defunct... More

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The history of ‘nightmare’

The ‘mare’ has many meanings

People awakening from a "nightmare" often have the sensation that they can't breathe. Not surprising: That's where the word "nightmare"... More

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A glut of spates and slews

The New York Times might want to invest in a thesaurus

In just a week, The New York Times discussed how "Indonesia has seen a spate of deadly attacks by Muslim... More

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Entree, entry, or entrée?

If you’re going to use it, say it right

Pronunciation sometimes makes the word. If someone has taken a bit part in a movie, one might say she got... More

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The Oxford English Dictionary adds words

Read up on the December updates

Four times a year, the venerable Oxford English Dictionary releases a list of words it has added, revised, or otherwise... More

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Understanding acronyms

But LOL is a bit of a mystery

A news columnist, Reg Henry, recently assailed what he called "the attack of the killer acronyms," which, he said, are... More

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The moon’s unusual names

It’s not all waxing and waning

The moon, like many children, goes through phases. And, just as children's phases have names ("terrible twos," puberty, etc. )... More

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How to use the colon

Understand its usage once and for all

The colon is one of the most versatile punctuation marks (and organs). We use it to mark time (he arrived... More

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The role of ‘in’ vs. ‘on’ for a popular phrase

You don’t know the behalf of it

Did you know that there's a difference between acting "on behalf of" something and "in behalf of" something? Didn't think... More

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Capitalize this

What the upper case means for the folk phrase: “If the good Lord’s willing and the creek don’t rise”

If you read a historical document, like the Declaration of Independence, you'll notice the capitalization of lot of words we... More

New survey reveals everything you think about freelancing is true - Data from Project Word quantifies challenges of freelance investigative reporting

Why one editor won’t run any more op-eds by the Heritage Foundation’s top economist - A reply to Paul Krugman on state taxes and job growth made some incorrect claims

Why we ‘stave off’ colds - It all started with wine

The New Republic, then and now - Tallying the staff turnover at the overhauled magazine

Why serious journalism can coexist with audience-pleasing content - Legacy media organizations should experiment with digital platforms while continuing to publish hard news


The rise of feelings journalism (TNR)

“Bloom engaged in an increasingly popular style of writing, which I’ve discussed on my blog before, which I call “feelings journalism.” It involves a writer making an argument based on what they imagine someone else is thinking, what they feel may be another person’s feelings. The realm of fact, of reporting, has been left behind.”

Things a war correspondent should never say (WSJ)

“The correspondent retelling war stories surely knows that fellow correspondents had faced the same dangers or worse”

On WaPo trying to interview a cow (National Journal)

“‘I wasn’t milked on the White House lawn by a strange man,’ The Washington Post—the venerable institution that would later come to break the Watergate scandal and win 48 Pulitzers—quoted her, a farm animal, as saying”

Bloggingheads

Greg Marx discusses democracy and news with Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute

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Who Owns What

The Business of Digital Journalism

A report from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Study Guides

Questions and exercises for journalism students.